ELK on Nutanix : Kibana

It might seem like I am doing things out of sequence by looking at the visualisation layer of the ELK stack next. However, recall in my original post , that I wanted to build sets  of unreplicated indexes and then use Logstash to fire test workloads at them. Hence, I am covering Elasticsearch and Kibana initially. This brings me to another technical point that I need to cover. In order for a single set of indexes to be actually recoverable, when running on a single node, we need to invoke the following parameters in our Elasticsearch playbook :

So in file: roles/elastic/vars/main.yml
...
elasticsearch_gateway.recover_after_nodes: 1
elasticsearch_gateway.recover_after_time: 5m
elasticsearch_gateway.expected_nodes: 1
...

These are then set in the elasticsearch.yml.j2 file as follows:

# file: roles/elastic/templates/elasticsearch.yml.j2
#{{ ansible_managed }}

...

# Allow recovery process after N nodes in a cluster are up:
#
#gateway.recover_after_nodes: 2
{% if elasticsearch_gateway_recover_after_nodes is defined %}
gateway.recover_after_nodes : {{ elasticsearch_gateway_recover_after_nodes}}
{% endif %}

and so on ....

This allows the indexes to be recovered when there is only a single node in the cluster. See below for the state of my indexes after a reboot:

[root@elkhost01 elasticsearch]# curl -XGET http://localhost:9200/_cluster/health?pretty
{
 "cluster_name" : "nx-elastic",
 "status" : "yellow",
 "timed_out" : false,
 "number_of_nodes" : 1,
 "number_of_data_nodes" : 1,
 "active_primary_shards" : 4,
 "active_shards" : 4,
 "relocating_shards" : 0,
 "initializing_shards" : 0,
 "unassigned_shards" : 4,
 "delayed_unassigned_shards" : 0,
 "number_of_pending_tasks" : 0,
 "number_of_in_flight_fetch" : 0
}

Lets now look at the Kibana playbook I am attempting. Unfortunately, Kibana is distributed as a compressed tar archive. This means that the yum or dnf modules are no help here. There is however a very useful unarchive module, but first we need to download the tar bundle using get_url as follows :

- name: download kibana tar file
 get_url: url=https://download.elasticsearch.org/kibana/kibana/kibana-{{ kibana_version }}-linux-x64.tar.gz
 dest=/tmp/kibana-{{ kibana_version }}-linux-x64.tar.gz mode=755
 tags: kibana

I initially tried unarchiving the Kibana bundle into /tmp. I then intended to copy everything below the version specific directory (/tmp/kibana-4.0.1-linux-x64) into the Ansible created /opt/kibana directory. This proved problematic as neither the synchronize nor the copy modules seemed setup to do mass copy/transfer between one directory structure to another. Maybe I am just not getting it – I even tried using with_item loops but no joy as fileglobs are not recursive. Answers on a postcard are always appreciated? In the end I just did this :

- name: create kibana directory
 become: true
 file: owner=kibana group=kibana path=/opt/kibana state=directory
 tags: kibana

- name: extract kibana tar file
 become: true
 unarchive: src=/tmp/kibana-{{ kibana_version }}-linux-x64.tar.gz dest=/opt/kibana copy=no
 tags: kibana

The next thing to do was to create a systemd service unit. There isn’t one for Kibana as there is no rpm package available. Usual templating applies here :

- name: install kibana as systemd service
 become: true
 template: src=kibana4.service.j2 dest=/etc/systemd/system/kibana4.service owner=root \
           group=root mode=0644
 notify:
 - restart kibana
 tags: kibana

And the service unit file looked like:

[ansible@ansible-host01 templates]$ cat kibana4.service.j2
{{ ansible_managed }}

[Service]
ExecStart=/opt/kibana/kibana-{{ kibana_version }}-linux-x64/bin/kibana
Restart=always
StandardOutput=syslog
StandardError=syslog
SyslogIdentifier=kibana4
User=root
Group=root
Environment=NODE_ENV=production

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

This all seemed to work as I could now access Kibana via my browser. No indexes yet of course :

kibana_initial_install

There are one or two plays I would like still like to document. Firstly, the ‘notify’ actions in some of the plays. These are used to call – in my case – the restart handlers. Which in turn causes the service in question to be restarted – see the next section :

# file: roles/kibana/handlers

- name: restart kibana
 become: true
 service: name=kibana state=restarted

I wanted to document this next feature simply because it’s so useful – tags. I have assigned a tag to every play/task in the playbook so far you will have noticed. For testing purposes they allow you to run specific plays. You can then troubleshoot just that particular play and see what’s going on.

 ansible-playbook -i ./production site.yml --tags "kibana" --ask-sudo-pass

Now that I have the basic plays to get my Elasticsearch and Kibana services up and running via Ansible, it’s time to start looking at Logstash. Next time I post on ELK type stuff, I will try to look at logging and search use cases. Once I crack how they work of course.

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